Category Archives: Images

Port Townsend Boat Show Photo Round Up

Hi Dorothy fans,

Having just got back from the 41st Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival, I can’t wait to show you some of the beauty. I have to say: a weekend is not enough time to see and absorb all the wooden boatiness that was to be seen! And the weather was truly PNW style: everything from wet and drizzly to dazzlingly sunny.

Here are some of my favourite shots:

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Friday night at rest in Point Hudson Harbour

Saturday was mostly a grey day, but no one in the PNW would shy away from getting on the water just because of a lack of sun!

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Slim bow of the 1926 Ted Geary-built “Pirate”. Mouthwatering. Follow Dorothy on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dorothysails1897/

Saturday night we had a spectacular full rainbow…
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and Sunday morning dawned perfectly bright and glorious…

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Sunday morning we witnessed the tradition of the bell ringing for those who crossed the bar in 2017. It hit all of of us particularly hard this year, as Johnny West was named and remembered. Carol Hasse did a beautiful job simply naming those who are missing among our nautical community. (I’ll post a video of the ceremony as soon as I get my new website, with lots of room for video, up and running.

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This email is overly long already, but before I close I wanted to post some hearty thanks:

  • to our friends Capt Bill and Brother Jim (his official title) who helped and hosted the Canadian (transient) population aboard Messenger III:

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  • to Hasse (can’t get a picture of her, she moves too quick!) aboard her ever-classy folkboat Lorraine:

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  • to Don and Janet who let many stay in their “Fish Holdtel” aboard Pacific and are always great fun to be with:

Fish Holdtel

  • to Michael aboard Stitch
  • and finally a massive shout out and many thanks for the good times to the Off Center Harbor crew, Steve Stone (pictured below left) and Eric Blake, who came out from Maine to spend their days collecting stories about our west coast fishboats, forestry boats and mission boats – which will come out soon in some spectacular video series on their website. If you haven’t signed up for their videos, you should definitely check it out because they do have the BEST boat video website going.

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And finally, if you aren’t following Dorothy’s Instagram account @dorothysails1897, you’re missing out on some action!

Dorothysails1897 instagram photo

A 1945 Norwegian Langesund sailing skiff called Havhesten, 19 ft of beauty. Oh so lovely! #sailing #skiff #porttownsend #pnwunplugged #pnwlife #woodenboat #woodenboatfestival #smallboats #classicboat #norwegian #dorothysails #dorothyatfest

I will follow up on news from Victoria’s Classic Boat Festival in the next few days, as well as info about how to order our new Anniversary Tees (1897-2017 = 120 years old!) and 2018 Calendars and Art Cards.

Til then, may fair winds keep you in good spirits and bright heart!

Tobi, Tony and Dorothy

Dorothy through your eyes

Photography by Byron Robb

Dorothy is not only a fast-sailing little yacht, she also happens to be very pretty boat with a striking design, both structurally and sculpturally beautiful. Many of you have said in interviews about Dorothy that they believe her beauty is part of the reason she has survived so long.

Dorothy-41-John Poirier

photo: John Poirier

So Tony and I have not been entirely surprised by the number of photographers passing through these shop doors over the past year – both professional and amateur – eager to capture the essence of Dorothy. Most of them start by walking around her in slight awe, eyes alight as they slowly pull out their cameras and begin to frame some of the hundreds of images that have by now been taken of her.

Dorothy is the ultimate photography subject – both for boat aficionados, and for those who simply love beautiful shapes. Even though her insides are bared, and the light around her ranges from soft daylight from the upper windows of Tony’s shop, to harsh fluorescents to neutral spotlights, she takes it all in with grace.

The challenge of “shooting Dorothy” lies not so much in which angle to capture, but which image best expresses her. Is it her magnificent, 6-foot fan-tailed stern, as Calgary-based photographer Byron Robb captured in the image at the top of this post?

Or her slender bow with sanded cedar planks on display, as noted Gabriola photographer John Poirier captured below?

Dorothy-56-John Poirier

Or is it the grain and wear of her old-growth Pacific forest timbers, which captivated David Andrews?

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Another Gabriolan photographer, Bill Pope, stunned us with his generous series of HDR photographs, which can be seen on his Flickr set “Dorothy restoration”. There are too many images to post here so I encourage you to take a look. Here are two of my favourites:

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Some of the very best photographs from our visiting artists will be on display at Victoria’s 37th Classic Boat Festival, which runs next weekend, August 29th through the 31st. A few images that were donated by the artist will be available for purchase at the silent auction on Friday night, proceeds from which go toward the Maritime Museum of B.C. (which is undertaking Dorothy’s restoration).

In other news, what has been holding up Dorothy‘s restoration? Well, as most of you likely know by now know, the MMBC had decided last spring not to re-launch Dorothy this year as originally planned. They are dedicated to doing the job right – which necessitates raising more money than they have right now, which is only enough to make her structurally sound – by having her topsides and cabin restored as well.

They are also coming up with a strategic plan as to what should be done with Dorothy once she’s back in the water. It will require more than simply moorage at a location where she can be seen and appreciated to advantage. She will also need a team of dedicated volunteers who know and understand the care required of wooden boats, and people who will take her out sailing!

So if you are interested in speaking to someone about the legacy fund for Dorothy’s continued care and restoration, or to be numbered on the team of volunteers as a “Friend of Dorothy”, please contact either John West (director and trustee for the MMBC) at john <at> johnwest <dot> ca or Angus Matthews (former owner) at angus <at> angusmatthews <dot> com.

Tony Grove has not been idle when not working on Dorothy. He recently completed a lovely 15-foot Passagemaker “take-apart” sailing dinghy for a client, from Chesapeake Light Craft plans. He left just yesterday for the Vancouver Wooden Boat Festival in Aja, his newly acquired strip-plank 34-foot Atkins schooner, towing the brand new little sailboat. They made it safely across, and both Aja and the Passagemaker will be in the festival.

So, here’s to festivals and photographers, beautiful wooden boats, and to all with eyes for lovely lines and beautiful shapes!

We look forward to seeing you at the Festival next weekend.

Cheers, Tobi and Tony

New season, new start, new shoot!

Tony Grove sanding Dorothy with Festool RO 125sander

Welcome back, Dorothy fans!

We are long overdue for an update and I do apologize for having left you so long. I hope your holidays were merry, restful and gave you time to set your sights on the exciting times coming ahead.

There was actually a lot of downtime here at Dorothy HQ over the holidays. Some was planned, some was not…

The unplanned downtime was due to Tony Grove (our amazing shipwright), getting in a rather nasty car accident just before Christmas on Gabriola’s SINGLE night of snow – as vintage ’65 Dodge vans apparently aren’t known for skilled snow negotiation– resulting in 1 broken van, 1 broken shoulder and 7 broken ribs. Ouch!

Poor Tony! But fear not, he’s come through amazingly, and with no apparent lasting damage. Apart from lots of pain in the first few weeks (anyone who made him laugh was promptly banned from the house!) and having to spend far more hours propped up on the couch than he was used to, he’s weathered it just fine. I’m happy to report that Tony is back on his feet and able to do more each day. It might be a few weeks yet until work can begin again on Dorothy, but he’s managed to stay busy in the meantime.

And there’s lots in the pipeline for the coming few weeks, so we are actually glad for a nice rest. Here’s a look at what’s coming:

– Tony finished his painting of Dorothy (yay!) just before his accident, and he’s very happy with the results. I must say her fantail has never been so beautifully highlighted! He’s framing it today for shipping soon. It was a commission for the Vancouver Law Society. We shot still frames as the painting developed, which have turned out GREAT and will an amazing tool for the documentary. [Photo to come – just have to wait til the client sees it first]

– AND we look forward to making a canvas reproduction of the Dorothy painting to give away to the biggest donor in our fall Indiegogo fundraiser. So nice to give gifts! That’s been one of my favourite parts of fundraising.

the German yacht magazine, YACHT, is sending a team to photograph and write a feature on Dorothy‘s restoration in mid-February

Tony Grove sanding Dorothy with Festool sander

Festool (a German manufacturer of premium equipment) has asked Tony to participate in their “Sand, Finish, Pass” promotion, in which they give out a Rotex RO 125 Multi-Mode Sander to woodworking specialists around the continent to test in the unique conditions of their own workplace. Tony is the only boatbuilder participating in the promotion, and we think they’re pretty lucky to get their sander tested on our precious Dorothy! Check out their Facebook page for some recent photos (actually screengrabs from the video Tobi is shooting for the contest)

– Tony and I (Tobi) will be speaking about Dorothy‘s restoration on Gabriola, in an event put together by the Gabriola Historical and Museum SocietyThursday, January 30 | Phoenix Auditorium at The Haven Doors open at 6:30, presentation at 7:00 | Admission by donation.

– Tony Grove will be speaking again in Victoria at the Maritime Museum of B.C. during Maritime Heritage week, Feb 17-23. Check out the MMBC’s snazzy new website in the meantime for details.

– this month, Heritage BC is featuring an article on Dorothy in their quarterly magazine to celebrate their theme “Heritage Afloat”

– we are looking forward to an interview with Sheryl MacKay of CBC’s NXNW morning show, probably at the end of this month. We’ll post details on when it goes to air.

and… finally… some real work. Tobi gets to pick up the camera again tomorrow to meet a very special person in Dorothy‘s life. This amazing person learned to sail on Dorothy, as the lovely boat belonged to their family about 5 decades ago. We are very much looking forward to this and have waited a loonnng time for this piece of the Dorothy history to fall into place. More on that this weekend, with some photos for sure.

Dorothy under garboards- seams reefed-T.Elliott

Dorothy is still patiently waiting for visitors to come see her in this incredibly beautiful state: wood sanded down to the grain, planks exposed, her “stuffing” taken out. So if you have a hankering to see this beautiful little ship, send Tony or I a note and arrange a visit. Once Tony gets back to work she won’t be like this for long! This shipwright moves fast, so get here while you can!

And finally, I believe I have sent out most, if not all, the gifts and thank yous for the donations that came in. IF you’re missing yours and I overlooked you somehow, please PLEASE send an email to tobi [at] tobielliott [dot] com and gently remind me! It wasn’t on purpose. There’s just a lot of things to keep tabs on. Doin’ my best…

Thanks for all your support. Keep sharing your stories and telling us what you are up to!

Tobi & Tony

Last call for Tees, “Sniffer Sisters” and…Merry Christmas everyone!

Hello!

It’s that crazy and wonderful time of year again! Like you, I’ve been busy!! – happily sending off perks and gifts since the campaign ended, organizing finances, sorting presents, zipping around Gabriola visiting my talented artist friends… but I also got to do some more filming as Tony Grove and a few good friends reefed Dorothy‘s seams & removed chainplates in late November, which was satisfying. Good to get back to work!

And last week I was able shoot something I’ve never done: an artist at work. Oh it was fun, but I tell you, I thought keeping up with “Tony the boatbuilder” was a challenge, but “Tony the painter” is equally an experience!

Tony has to work fast to avoid paint drying before he can blend it, and he was quite often finished a section just as I was finally set up, framed right and focussed. So… now I’m set, ready to shoot him painting. But THEN he would stand back for 5 minutes and contemplate. Sigh. Re-frame, capture and… he’s moving again. Ahhhhhh….. Seriously hard work. But it’s worth it because this wonderful painting he’s working on will figure in our film (“Between Wood and Water”) as we discover Dorothy in a new way – through the eyes of a marine artist. Isn’t it beautiful?

Tony painting Dorothy-background complete

Tony painting Dorothy background2    Tony painting Dorothy-background 1

Next week I’ll post some updated shots of his Dorothy painting, once Tony’s satisfied with it and happy to release it into the world.  (Special thanks to the donor from Cowichan Bay who contributed $1,000 to the film for a print of this lovely painting – we are sure you’re going to love it!)

10 days left til Christmas Eve… are you feeling as unprepared as I am? Or are you one of those who is eagerly ready by Dec 1, with that contented feeling that your Christmas Cake is well soaked in rum, your presents are wrapped, and you have already picked out the Gift Crackers to put on everyone’s plate? Wait – I don’t know anyone like that, so don’t feel bad if you are still running around. It’s that crazy, wonderful time of year!

However, if you’re strapped for time and still need some gifts, Dorothy and I are here to the rescue! We have some wonderful perks left over from the campaign, and if you get your order in before Dec 16 I can get it to you in time for Christmas:

Dorothy Tee-shirts – a bargain at $30 ea. (incl. shipping within Canada), or $25 each locally (Gabriola Island)

Dot tees-4 colours2

Sizes available:
Sapphire (top left) in kids sizes, and Men’s Sm and Med
Indigo (top right): Men’s Sm and Med, an XL or 2
Blue Dusk (bottom left): Men’s Med and XL
Navy (bottom right) – LOTS of Men’s sizes: Sm, Med, L and XL
and some Women’s Sm, Med and XL (sorry no Large left)


hand-screenprinted “Dorothy and the Grey Whale” Tees by local artist Kate Wood: $35 (incl shipping) or $30 locally. (Note, Men’s coral not available, I believe we have a pale Blue instead)

Kate's Dorothy and Grey Whale tees

a wonderful kids book “The Sniffer Sisters and the Mystery of the Magic Collars” donated by Gabriolan Jeffrey James (based on his real-life Labradors Oli and Madi)

This is a GREAT book for readers age 7-9, or adults! Anyone who loves dogs will love this… I laughed aloud reading it, and the illustrations (by Kerry Bell) are simply beautiful. 2 available: $20 each (incl shipping within Canada)

If you need more, you can order from Jeffrey’s website www.sniffersisters.com and support a local artist!

Sniffer Sisters Cover-Jeffrey James  Sniffer Sisters Illustration1-Jeffrey James

Sniffer Sisters Text-by Jeffrey James

And finally, one big-ticket item left that was not claimed during the campaign: a framed archivally framed giclee print, by renowned nature photographer John Poirier“Gabriola Island Forest Details No. 20” (11 x 16 inches in a 16 x 20 frame). 1 available for $150 (plus shipping)

Gabriola Island Forest Details Number 20

Thank you so much for your support everyone, and happy shopping, sailing, or cozying up by the fire!

Reefing Images Part 2

Happy Friday everyone!

For the boat-geeks and Dorothy lovers out there, some images from last week’s reefing session. Thanks to Liz Salls for her meticulous help reefing the delicate seams, and David Baker, who developed a new method of cutting out the old material so the soft cedar plank edges wouldn’t be damaged.

And of course, always big thanks to Tony Grove, boat restoration expert, who carefully explains all he’s doing for the camera even as he’s guiding Dorothy’s care every step of the way. More news coming soon. And possibly a video.

If you ask nicely…

Have a great weekend, Tobi

 

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Reefing the seams

Reefing the seams today on Dorothy’s port side. Bit by bit, inch by inch, the caulking is being pried out.

Tony Grove is working with David Baker today and tomorrow. David had owned Dorothy in the 1980s and is working in some areas around planks that he himself installed.

Together they are uncovering some surprising materials used to pay her seams over the years. In some cases, the caulking material hasn’t been touched at all, meaning it’s original, and 116 years old.

Quite something to see!

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Dorothy under garboards- seams reefed-T.Elliott Tobi Elliott filming Tony Grove reefing Dorothy's seams Tobi Elliott filming Tony Grove reefing Dorothy's seams2 Tony Grove and David Baker with Dorothy Tony Grove reefing seams on Dorothy Nov 2013

Digging down to gold

Date: 1910 "Dorothy wins international race." Courtesy MMBC archives

Date: 1910 “Dorothy wins international race.” Courtesy MMBC archives

When I first learned that Tony Grove would be restoring Dorothy for the Maritime Museum of B.C., my immediate thought was, “Someone must document this!” But when I actually visited the MMBC and scanned through the treasure chest of supporting material chronicling her life on this coast – the photos, the wealth of logbook entries and letters of correspondence between her first owner, W.H. Langley, and her designer, Linton Hope – I realized this story could be much more than a documentary about the restoration process, it could be a wonderfully rich and substantial love story about sailing on this coast. 

Now, to those of you who love watching how-to videos of wooden boat restorations, (forgive me if I’m wrong here) but if we only focused on the restoration drama that’s happening in Tony Grove’s shop, the rest of the world would quickly bored. There’s only so much sanding, scraping and plank replacing that one can watch! Although a “restoration documentary” would have its own narrative arc, we need to see why people are going to such lengths to save this boat. What is so compelling about Dorothy? Why has she survived this long? 

Truth is, a wooden boat doesn’t survive for over a century, with 80-90% of her original planking intact, by chance. She had to have had an extraordinary level of care throughout her life. Someone, at every point of her life, was either sailing her, saving her, restoring her or searching for a better steward for her care than they could presently give. That is what I love about the Dorothy story: the drama lies in those who sacrificed over the years to keep her alive and sailing. 

Even if you don’t have a sailboat, have never sailed, or don’t like boats or the water, you likely have something in your life that gives it added meaning and depth. Not only can we grow in character from learning attention and care, responsibility and stewardship from loving humans, but beautiful objects, too, can make us grow. We all need something to love.

And the more you care for your lovely thing, whether it be a home, a guitar, a bike, or a VW Doc Bus! as my friend Mandy Leith can attest to, the more you learn how to keep your lovely thing in the best possibly condition, and the more your heart expands.

By focussing on the romance and relationship between a beautiful, functional object (or being) that brings you joy, and you, as the human stewarding its care, I hope to make this story universally appealing.

Here are some photos I recently discovered on my recent “dig” through the Museum’s archives:

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Dorothy Archives

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Campaign is still on for another 11 days! http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/dorothy-documentary/x/1371948

Don’t delay, if you have thought about contributing to the documentary but haven’t yet, we could use your help now! We are at $5,560 and need to raise $10,000 for vital shoots this summer and fall.

Please spread the word and help make this campaign a success. Thank you!

Love, Tobi

Dorothy loses her rubrail

Dorothy stern end no rubrail-Tony GroveLast week, shipwright Tony Grove began cutting off Dorothy‘s rubrail, which was rotting and posing a danger to the integrity of her hull. There’s a bit of a debate right now as to whether Dorothy was originally designed with a rubrail, but there’s no question that the rubrail she currently has (had) was put on fairly recently, in the last half of the century.

This rubrail had been made of red oak, which is a hardwood, but one that doesn’t hold up well in the marine environment. It was literally rotting away – deeply in some places – affecting the planks immediately beneath it. It’s fitted along Dorothy‘s sheerline, where the deck meets the hull. and sticks out about 1 inch to prevent the vessel from being damaged if something were to rub up against her hull. Rubrails can also be used to cover the overlap of the decking material.

Some argue Dorothy looks better – cleaner , more shapely – without it. What do you think?

Images below are pulled from footage shot October 2013, by Tobi Elliott © Arise Enterprises. (Some images will look a bit jagged because they are pulled off a preview version of the video footage. If you’re viewing this on in your email, the full gallery of images will appear much better on the original blog post at dorothysails.com)

The gallery below shows how Tony painstakingly cuts out around each fastening using a Fein reciprocating cutter, then chips away the wood to unscrew or, in some cases, unhappily snap the bad fastenings off that have rusted or rotten into the wood, which enables him to pry off the rubrail.

NOTE: We have extended our fundraiser for the documentary about Dorothy, which you can find here at http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/dorothy-documentary We have some amazing new “thank you gifts” available, among them jewellery pendants made from original copper fastenings removed from Dorothy, and turned into works of art by noted silversmith and jeweller Lindsay Stocking Godfrey, for $100. Check out the site, we are accepting donations for 2 more weeks!

Below: after taking off the rubrail, Tony uncovered this upper starboard side plank that appeared so rotten he just had to pry it off to see how extensively the rot had spread beneath. Thankfully once he got a look inside he could see the rot hadn’t spread far. All images © Arise Enterprises.

Removing rotten stern plank Ripping off rotten stern plank Looking into stern rotten plank hole

The campaign of a lifetime

I just looked at the stats for our Indiegogo campaign fundraiser for the Dorothy documentary. In 25 days, since Sept 13, there have been 36 separate contributions, for a total of $2,785 – and… this is the best part… ONLY 5 days when NO ONE donated.

Isn’t that incredible?! Each of the 20 days, someone out there sat down and thought, “I want to support this project and help get this film made,” and then picked a perk and gave out of their hard-earned money.

Campaign update week 4

To me, that’s a miracle. Maybe from where you’re sitting, you look at this campaign and think, “They are so far from their goal! What are they thinking? Almost $7,000 to go and only 3 weeks left? What can she be happy about?”

But let me tell you, from where I sit, this is an amazing thing that’s happening, and I am deeply thankful for each and every person who has stepped forward to give.

Because it’s not about how much is raised. Really.

Truly.

Although my credit card company will tell you differently – that it’s very MUCH about how much we raise – I can’t this of this project in terms of dollar amounts.

I think of it in terms of how many people have been moved by Dorothy‘s story. Because that’s why I got on board. Not because this was going to be a great commercial enterprise. Not because I wanted to make a film that would bring in tons of money (otherwise I would have made it a reality series, with Tony Grove throwing mallets around the shop or something, and not an actual, quality documentary, which promises to make no money whatsoever.) Not because I knew a lot about boats or I was a die-hard sailor or I just love sawdust or boat shops or whatever.

Nope. I did it simply because Dorothy captured my heart, with her quiet elegance, her sublime design, and her pedigreed planks. She is simply beautiful, she is a living piece of history and she deserves centre stage. 

So for me, success would be that more and more people get interested and invested in this story every day, and want to see this film made. Raising funds is elementary. Raising community is much more exciting.

We will get there, no question.

Will you be aboard with us?

In faith and lots of gratitude, this (Canadian) Thanksgiving, Tobi

PS. I just found out via Facebook that an update on Dorothy‘s restoration is going to be featured in the “Currents” Section of Wooden Boat Magazine’s upcoming Nov/Dec Issue. Now, talk about exciting community!

Whirlwind Victoria Classic

Over at Dorothy HQ, we are all about classic boats: wooden boats… mainly sailboats, with some love for beautifully designed powerboats too. Appropriately enough, after our adventures at the Classic Boat festival in Victoria, B.C. last weekend, this post is being written aboard a classic boat tucked away in Friday Harbour: the Messenger III, a medical missionary boat built in 1946. It is fantastic.

Just want to interject a hearty Welcome! to all the new friends and Dorothy fans who have joined us since this adventure began. And just in time too, because we have some wonderful images from the festival to share.

It was such a pleasure to meet you, to hear your interest in the Dorothy story, and see you walk away with a smile and occasionally, a t-shirt from our little stand. And a HUGE, big thank you to Harry Martin, Terese Ayre, Laura Simons, Fred Apstein, Misha Warbanski and Arlene Carson who helped man the stand, carry gear/hold the boom/get release forms signed, etc. Thank you so much. We can’t do this without helpers like you!

Before we head to our next adventure at the 2013 Wooden Boat Festival, where Tony Grove (shipwright) and I (Tobi, filmmaker) will be speaking about Dorothy‘s history and present-day restoration, let me introduce two other wonderful people that Dorothy has brought our way: Clay Evans, procurer of fine beverages and artisan cheese Canadian Coast Guard Search and Rescue, author of “Rescue at sea” and all-around stand up guy, and Bill Noon, war correspondent Canadian Coast Guard Commanding Officer, Captain of many ships and in particular, of Messenger III. Together, we make up a merry band that is slowly making its way down to Port Townsend.

Brief recap of the Victoria Classic: lots of filming went from sunrise to sunset, lots of T-shirts were sold (almost $1,000 raised! THANK YOU Pacific Northwest Boaters!) and we captured some great interviews, but time is short so I’ll let the images take it away. Unless otherwise noted, all photos are by Tony Grove. (Check out the ones he took from atop HMCS Oriole’s spreaders!)

Love, Tobi