Monthly Archives: November 2013

Reefing the seams

Reefing the seams today on Dorothy’s port side. Bit by bit, inch by inch, the caulking is being pried out.

Tony Grove is working with David Baker today and tomorrow. David had owned Dorothy in the 1980s and is working in some areas around planks that he himself installed.

Together they are uncovering some surprising materials used to pay her seams over the years. In some cases, the caulking material hasn’t been touched at all, meaning it’s original, and 116 years old.

Quite something to see!

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Dorothy under garboards- seams reefed-T.Elliott Tobi Elliott filming Tony Grove reefing Dorothy's seams Tobi Elliott filming Tony Grove reefing Dorothy's seams2 Tony Grove and David Baker with Dorothy Tony Grove reefing seams on Dorothy Nov 2013

Off to the Post I go!

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It’s always so fun to send Dorothy swag in the mail, and I never get tired of writing to those who have supported us around the world.

Today we’re sending off 6 Dorothysails Tees, a package of Panacea Herbs organic goodness, and some lovely art cards from Gabriola. All part of the perks we get to give away to those who donated!

Giving back is fun. Almost as much fun as… say… Making documentaries! Almost.

Thanks again for supporting us everyone, we raised over $8,000 for the film, which is incredible!

More news to come. Love, Tobi

Land-Ho! Campaign countdown party this Friday night!

Land-Ho! Campaign countdown party this Friday night!

To celebrate the close to an amazing fundraiser for the documentary about Dorothy, join us this Friday at Artworks Gallery on Gabriola.

When: Friday Nov 15, 7-9 PM

Where: Artworks @ the Village, North Rd, Gabriola Island.

What: Watch some Dorothy videos, listen to music by local musician Tim Harrison, enjoy some snacks and countdown with us a successful fundraising campaign for the local production of the documentary “Between Wood and Water” about Dorothy, Canada’s oldest sailboat.

**Note: Some of the artwork by local artists and entrepreneurs that hasn’t been claimed during the campaign will be available for purchase by donation. Come and see what’s there, you might just find a perfect gift for Christmas, and can support this film at the same time.

Event on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/events/698653636811454/
You can still donate here, campaign is live until Friday Nov 15 at midnight PST: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/dorothy-documentary/x/1371948

More gold!

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For those of you not on Facebook – and I know there are more than a few – I’m adding some of the images I took recently from my time at the Royal Victoria Yacht Club. I was so delighted to discover that one of the club’s archivists had carefully searched every reference to “yachting” in the Victoria Times Colonist, and printed them out from microfiche records… Right back to the inception of the club in the 1890s! So it wasn’t too difficult to read through the 1896-1900 years and find references to WH Langley, Dorothy’s first owner, and his dealings with the Club. He was Club Commodore in 1904-06. He also served as the lawyer for the plaintiff when the Club sued the builder of its first clubhouse after it sank! And I got to read of the tragedy that befell the Queen’s Jubilee celebrations in Victoria when a train carrying merrymakers to the waterfront so they could watch the yacht races and mock battles, crashed into the water, killing some 50 souls. The news accounts are so compelling I must admit I got sidetracked a bit from my Dorothy research.

Fascinating stuff. But what’s more, there was a whole binder full of Dorothy material that I hadn’t seen before: letters from Langley to Linton Hope in England, Dorothy’s designer, lists of Langley’s expenditures on his new boat, bills of sale on everything from the anchor to ropes and lead for her keel! This man was meticulous, and somehow these precious records have been preserved for over a century. The copies I saw were photocopies to be true, but it must mean that the originals aren’t far.

Thank you to Ken Reksten and Gord Nickells for letting me in and giving me so much time with these precious documents. More gold!

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Keep in mind the campaign to support the documentary about Dorothy’s life “Between Wood and Water” is online for only one more week! Donate now and get a choice of some amazing perks and gifts (in time for Christmas!) Share with your friends and family and be part of making this doc an important film in the canon of BC maritime history. Campaign ends Nov 15. Thank you!

Love, Tobi

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Digging down to gold

Date: 1910 "Dorothy wins international race." Courtesy MMBC archives

Date: 1910 “Dorothy wins international race.” Courtesy MMBC archives

When I first learned that Tony Grove would be restoring Dorothy for the Maritime Museum of B.C., my immediate thought was, “Someone must document this!” But when I actually visited the MMBC and scanned through the treasure chest of supporting material chronicling her life on this coast – the photos, the wealth of logbook entries and letters of correspondence between her first owner, W.H. Langley, and her designer, Linton Hope – I realized this story could be much more than a documentary about the restoration process, it could be a wonderfully rich and substantial love story about sailing on this coast. 

Now, to those of you who love watching how-to videos of wooden boat restorations, (forgive me if I’m wrong here) but if we only focused on the restoration drama that’s happening in Tony Grove’s shop, the rest of the world would quickly bored. There’s only so much sanding, scraping and plank replacing that one can watch! Although a “restoration documentary” would have its own narrative arc, we need to see why people are going to such lengths to save this boat. What is so compelling about Dorothy? Why has she survived this long? 

Truth is, a wooden boat doesn’t survive for over a century, with 80-90% of her original planking intact, by chance. She had to have had an extraordinary level of care throughout her life. Someone, at every point of her life, was either sailing her, saving her, restoring her or searching for a better steward for her care than they could presently give. That is what I love about the Dorothy story: the drama lies in those who sacrificed over the years to keep her alive and sailing. 

Even if you don’t have a sailboat, have never sailed, or don’t like boats or the water, you likely have something in your life that gives it added meaning and depth. Not only can we grow in character from learning attention and care, responsibility and stewardship from loving humans, but beautiful objects, too, can make us grow. We all need something to love.

And the more you care for your lovely thing, whether it be a home, a guitar, a bike, or a VW Doc Bus! as my friend Mandy Leith can attest to, the more you learn how to keep your lovely thing in the best possibly condition, and the more your heart expands.

By focussing on the romance and relationship between a beautiful, functional object (or being) that brings you joy, and you, as the human stewarding its care, I hope to make this story universally appealing.

Here are some photos I recently discovered on my recent “dig” through the Museum’s archives:

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Dorothy Archives

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Campaign is still on for another 11 days! http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/dorothy-documentary/x/1371948

Don’t delay, if you have thought about contributing to the documentary but haven’t yet, we could use your help now! We are at $5,560 and need to raise $10,000 for vital shoots this summer and fall.

Please spread the word and help make this campaign a success. Thank you!

Love, Tobi