Tag Archives: Canada’s oldest sailboat

Hooked on Wooden Boats Podcast

Hooked on Wooden boats

… is live! “Wooden Boat Dan” interviewed Tony and I at this year’s Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival, and he put together a great podcast featuring Dorothy‘s story.

Here it is: HookedOnWoodenBoats.com/148

If you ever wanted to hear a semi-complete (and rather meandering) history on Dorothy‘s previous owners and life on the west coast, this is your opportunity. And I must say, Tony did a great job describing Dorothy‘s current state and the boatbuilding techniques he’s employing to bring her back to life.

Thank you, Dan, for giving our Dorothy such a thoughtful treatment! It was a great experience to be interviewed by you and we really enjoyed your relaxed, “down-home” attitude.

Y’all should check out his website and catch up with his wealth of podcasts. Dan is doing great work.

Coming next week: an update with lots of photos showing the latest steps in her restoration. Tony has made significant changes in Dorothy’s bow section, and I’ll get him to describe how he used a “comealong” to pull together some big pieces that have separated over the years.

Have a wonderful Sunday, everyone.

Tobi and Tony

Steamboxes, oak bending and baked potatoes

The Grove Woodworking School, located on lovely Gabriola Island off the east coast of Vancouver Island, B.C., is a marvel of order and efficiency. Tony Grove’s shop is beautifully organized – partly because that’s how he works, and partly because he needs every bit of space available, especially with a 30 foot sloop taking up most of the room in his shop, her bowsprit touching the bay doors, AND a painting studio up on the mezzanine.

Passagemaker below Dorothy-T.Grove

The man has worked in enough places (read: other company shops) over his 30 year career in boat building to learn what works and what doesn’t, and he knows exactly what he wants to see in his own shop. So, as I’ve learned over the past months of filming Dorothy’s restoration, when Tony works up a head of steam about efficiency, organization and putting everything in its place, I keep my mouth shut and just let it roll.

In terms of steamboxes, what apparently works for Tony is a humble design, built from recycled plywood, built as small as possible – pretty much the exact opposite of complicated and expensive. What doesn’t work is a clunky, permanent structure that takes up more precious room than it needs.

I had been so anticipating seeing this amazing steambox in action – picturing some long, elegant box that could fit a plank at least – that when he actually brought out his box to begin steaming some oak pieces to replace Dorothy’s forward straps, I have to admit to a little disappointment.

It looked just a little too humble.

Steambox set up outside Tony's shop

But really, I’ve learned, it’s about whatever works. (See previous post for more on the results from this box and photos of Dorothy’s new straps.)

Tony’s steamboxes are portable, so they can be taken apart easily and transported anywhere, and he makes them on the fly, to fit the piece of furniture or boat piece he’s working with. He makes them just large enough to fit the piece of wood he’s working with, so as to not waste a ton of energy heating up steam to fill a big box when it’s not needed.

And the heating agency is … shall we say … less than imposing. The box Tony set up outside his shop for this job uses a simple electric kettle recycled from the local depot, and a piece of rubber radiator hose.

Simple, efficient, economical, and it works.

Tony grove steambox special

And it makes lunch, too!

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At 1.5 hours per inch of wood thickness, (Tony was steaming and bending 1.5 inch oak straps) was just the right amount of time to cook some potatoes for lunch.

Potatoes steam box

What does your ideal steambox – or workspace – look like? Email us a photo at dorothysails@gmail.com and we could feature it in the next newsletter. Stay in touch.

Happy sailing!

Love from Dorothy HQ – Tobi and Tony

Dorothy loses her rubrail

Dorothy stern end no rubrail-Tony GroveLast week, shipwright Tony Grove began cutting off Dorothy‘s rubrail, which was rotting and posing a danger to the integrity of her hull. There’s a bit of a debate right now as to whether Dorothy was originally designed with a rubrail, but there’s no question that the rubrail she currently has (had) was put on fairly recently, in the last half of the century.

This rubrail had been made of red oak, which is a hardwood, but one that doesn’t hold up well in the marine environment. It was literally rotting away – deeply in some places – affecting the planks immediately beneath it. It’s fitted along Dorothy‘s sheerline, where the deck meets the hull. and sticks out about 1 inch to prevent the vessel from being damaged if something were to rub up against her hull. Rubrails can also be used to cover the overlap of the decking material.

Some argue Dorothy looks better – cleaner , more shapely – without it. What do you think?

Images below are pulled from footage shot October 2013, by Tobi Elliott © Arise Enterprises. (Some images will look a bit jagged because they are pulled off a preview version of the video footage. If you’re viewing this on in your email, the full gallery of images will appear much better on the original blog post at dorothysails.com)

The gallery below shows how Tony painstakingly cuts out around each fastening using a Fein reciprocating cutter, then chips away the wood to unscrew or, in some cases, unhappily snap the bad fastenings off that have rusted or rotten into the wood, which enables him to pry off the rubrail.

NOTE: We have extended our fundraiser for the documentary about Dorothy, which you can find here at http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/dorothy-documentary We have some amazing new “thank you gifts” available, among them jewellery pendants made from original copper fastenings removed from Dorothy, and turned into works of art by noted silversmith and jeweller Lindsay Stocking Godfrey, for $100. Check out the site, we are accepting donations for 2 more weeks!

Below: after taking off the rubrail, Tony uncovered this upper starboard side plank that appeared so rotten he just had to pry it off to see how extensively the rot had spread beneath. Thankfully once he got a look inside he could see the rot hadn’t spread far. All images © Arise Enterprises.

Removing rotten stern plank Ripping off rotten stern plank Looking into stern rotten plank hole

The campaign of a lifetime

I just looked at the stats for our Indiegogo campaign fundraiser for the Dorothy documentary. In 25 days, since Sept 13, there have been 36 separate contributions, for a total of $2,785 – and… this is the best part… ONLY 5 days when NO ONE donated.

Isn’t that incredible?! Each of the 20 days, someone out there sat down and thought, “I want to support this project and help get this film made,” and then picked a perk and gave out of their hard-earned money.

Campaign update week 4

To me, that’s a miracle. Maybe from where you’re sitting, you look at this campaign and think, “They are so far from their goal! What are they thinking? Almost $7,000 to go and only 3 weeks left? What can she be happy about?”

But let me tell you, from where I sit, this is an amazing thing that’s happening, and I am deeply thankful for each and every person who has stepped forward to give.

Because it’s not about how much is raised. Really.

Truly.

Although my credit card company will tell you differently – that it’s very MUCH about how much we raise – I can’t this of this project in terms of dollar amounts.

I think of it in terms of how many people have been moved by Dorothy‘s story. Because that’s why I got on board. Not because this was going to be a great commercial enterprise. Not because I wanted to make a film that would bring in tons of money (otherwise I would have made it a reality series, with Tony Grove throwing mallets around the shop or something, and not an actual, quality documentary, which promises to make no money whatsoever.) Not because I knew a lot about boats or I was a die-hard sailor or I just love sawdust or boat shops or whatever.

Nope. I did it simply because Dorothy captured my heart, with her quiet elegance, her sublime design, and her pedigreed planks. She is simply beautiful, she is a living piece of history and she deserves centre stage. 

So for me, success would be that more and more people get interested and invested in this story every day, and want to see this film made. Raising funds is elementary. Raising community is much more exciting.

We will get there, no question.

Will you be aboard with us?

In faith and lots of gratitude, this (Canadian) Thanksgiving, Tobi

PS. I just found out via Facebook that an update on Dorothy‘s restoration is going to be featured in the “Currents” Section of Wooden Boat Magazine’s upcoming Nov/Dec Issue. Now, talk about exciting community!

Dorothy Documentary fundraiser is live!

The homepage for our fundraising campaign to raise $10,000 for production

The homepage for our fundraising campaign to raise $10,000 for production

We are just 5 days in to our online crowdfunding campaign for the documentary about Dorothy, and already we have 5 lovely donors! Thank you to all who have donated or spread the word – we couldn’t do this without you.

If you haven’t heard about the campaign yet, check it out here: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/dorothy-documentary/ and watch the video. (and watch Tobi + Dorothy as never seen before…)

We have done all we can to film up until now out of our own pockets and time. But a documentary of this depth – with archival images, the retelling of sailing stories from long-ago owners, and some real beauty shots to show the love of sailing on this coast – requires a serious treatment. And this is where YOU come in.

Crowdfunding means many people (a “crowd”) from around the world each chip in a little to help meet a big goal. We don’t need a lot from each person, but we do need you to spread the word so a lot of people get on board. And then we can easily meet our goal!

You can help us out with 4 really simple steps: 1. Watch the video; 2. Pick a perk (gift) at the level you want to donate, 3. “Contribute” and off you go! (You need only a credit card or Paypal account.) and then 5. SPREAD THE WORD.

All funds go directly to production, making sure we don’t miss a beat in shooting this amazing story of Dorothy’s restoration, happening now on Gabriola Island.

Thanks for your help.

Love, love, Tobi and Team

Tobi, as excited now as on the first day of shooting, almost 1 year ago! Photo credit: Klint Burton

Tobi, as excited now as on the first day of shooting, almost 1 year ago! Photo credit: Klint Burton

Off to mail some t-shirts, and back to watch some news coverage

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Heigh ho, heigh ho- it’s off to the ferry I go! I’m stepping off my beloved tiny island to the bigish town of Nanaimo on Vancouver Island to put some tees in the mail. They’re headed to New Westminster, Ottawa and Abbotsford. A big thank you to all the new supporters who asked for and bought a Dorothy Tee or three! Super happy to be able to send these off at last.

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It has been a busy week! Following a huge response to the Pacific Yachting story that came out last week, we (ok, I) spammed contacted conventional media outlets to see if any would be interested in covering the new developments in Dorothy‘s adventures, and indeed they are! Global TV News is sending a cameraman out of Victoria to interview Tony Grove this afternoon and get some shots of him working on the ol’ gal. So that’s nice! If I can just get him to shave now and stop using salty language…

And… drumroll please… I’ve set a date for our Indiegogo.com crowdsourcing production fundraiser to start!!! It begins in…

wait for it…

Less than a week! Aug 12 to be exact (my big sister’s birthday – <3 you Sis)

Yes, I'm going public with this story and need all the help I can get from Dorothy supporters worldwide. If you have an idea how you could help promote the campaign, do email me. And if you don’t know what crowd sourcing is, email me. Will write more about it in a few days and give you an idea of what you can do to help.

Check the blog later as I will post some pics of all the action this afternoon. Hope all goes well. Stay tuned!

– Tobi Elliott, Producer and Mail Queen