Tag Archives: Boat show

Victoria Classic Boat Festival Memories

TEAL stern

It’s been a month since boat show season ended in the Pacific Northwest. Some of you are hopefully still on the water, while others are buttoning down for the winter.

Wait, did I say winter? It can’t be! Forget that – it’s still glorious fall in the PNW! You still time to get out on the water if, like me, your boat is waiting for you but you only put the sails up … once… and haven’t actually gone sailing yet. (My excuses are pitiful. Believe me, I know I do a disservice to anyone who lives in the prairies when I let a whole summer go by without sailing. If there’s one thing DOROTHY has taught me, it’s that experiencing life with a boat is better than without!)

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So let’s think of kinder, warmer things, like boat shows! We had a fantastic time at this year’s Victoria Classic Boat Festival, the 40th annual. While nothing could make up for the absence of John West, a key founder and integral, energetic part of the festival over its four decades, the sun shone bright on the docks full of beautiful boats and interested visitors.

It was the first year the Maritime Museum of B.C. took the helm and led the organization and programming, and they did an admirable job running the show. Congratulations!

DOROTHY was on hand in spirit, if not in physical form. As it was her 120th anniversary, we celebrated with cake in the hall of the MMBC, and a hearty Happy Birthday.

To make sure she was present “on the docks”, we hosted a table Saturday and Sunday with promotional materials, photographs and new 2018 calendars and anniversary T-shirts for sale. I was delighted that former owner Angus Matthews was able to join me on Sunday to chat with people on the docks.

It was interesting to hear the response when we asked people whether they had heard of “Canada’s oldest sailboat”. Most said, no, but were intrigued. Then we’d ask where they were from and roughly half the time, they were from Victoria! I realized there are two distinct groups in this small but passionate boat community: those who have been following the Dorothy adventure closely, and those who don’t know anything about her story at all.

I feel we have a lot of work to do in getting the Dorothy story out there. If you want to help with our mission of keeping her memory alive while the committee continues to raise funds for the rest of the restoration, you can help! We still have 2018 Anniversary Calendars for sale, with images ranging from the MMBC archives, her sailing in the 1920s-40s and 1980s, contemporary photos in Tony Grove’s shop, and even an exclusive shot of her from the Langley family that has never before been released to the public.

Or, get our NEW T-shirt (Maroon and Heather Grey) with her anniversary dates 1897-2017. Send one to your friends, family members, or enemies, and tell them the story of DOROTHY. Or get an art card for Christmas mailouts, we have 6 different beautiful art cards. Email me at dorothysails@gmail.com for prices and orders. Christmas is just around the corner!

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After costs, proceeds are split between the restoration fund and the documentary, Between Wood and Water.

For our Victoria boat show round up, the best thing from my perspective was the raft of forestry boats and workboats, most from British Columbia but a few from down south. I love their stories.

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I was intrigued to find out that restored B.C. forestry boats outnumber U.S. boats about three to one. One notable exception is the 90-year old TEAL (image up top) which has a rich history patrolling the Alaskan coast and is now docked at Friday Harbor, WA. She won Best Conversion.

It seemed like there were less sailboats than usual – perhaps because ORIOLE and MARTHA were missing (and perhaps it’s my biased eyes that want to see sailboats everywhere!) – but there were an amazing representation of all kinds of classic boats to grace the docks.

Here were some of the awards handed out:

  • Best Restored Power: the 1963 FLYING EAGLE, a Maine Lobsterboat that travelled to the west coast and was authentically restored by Rick Strollo;
  • Best Restored Sailboat: ISOBAR, with TEAKBIRD getting Honorable Mention (restored by our friends at Abernathy and Gaudin);
  • Oldest Powerboat: 1917 OCEAN BELLE;
  • Oldest Sailboat: 1922 LOON (which was also built by J.J. Robinson, DOROTHY’s builder);
  • Best Overall Powerboat: DEERLEAP;
  • Best Overall Sailboat: PACIFIC GRACE.

The second best thing about the festival was hanging out with our friends Eric and Steve from OFFCENTERHARBOR.com. They were doing double duty as boat oglers and storytellers, getting some juicy bits on their favourite boats in the PNW. We love OCH videos, and if you haven’t checked them out yet, you should definitely subscribe because they feature not only the hottest boats, but the best stories on people making and restoring them.

Look for them to feature PACIFIC, MESSENGER III and STITCH – all workboats of some kind – in the coming weeks.

So that’s it for our boat show season – how was yours? Did you participate? Drop us a line or write a comment if you have a story to tell. Because after all, next to an insane desire to drop 1000s of dollars on our beloved vessels, the stories we get to tell about them is the next best reason to own them, right?

If you have friends, neighbours or family members that don’t know about Canada’s oldest functioning, Canadian-made sailboat, consider giving them a Dorothy-related gift this year and helping us spread the word.

Thank you Friends! And happy sailing!

Tobi

 

Classic Boat Festival 2016

We made it! It’s that time of year again, and we couldn’t be happier. And after a pounding rain all night, the weather saw fit to cooperate with some glorious sun in time for the opening of the 39th Classic Boat Festival in Victoria. 

It’s such an honour to be here and to be mingling with people who are passionate about boats and, in many cases, have done so much to preserve and promote their own gorgeous vessels. I know from documenting Dorothy’s story that keeping a classic boat alive – especially a wooden boat – often calls for a sacrifice of time, energy and resources that people can only give if they’re in it for the love of their vessel. 

I’ll be here all weekend with materials and T-shirts promoting the documentary and Dorothy‘s restoration status. Tony Grove is judging boats in the festival, and everyone else is just enjoying walking the docks in the sunshine. 

Happy Labour Day weekend, everyone!

Ps I had to sneak in a shot of my second all-time favourite boat, Martha. She is looking just (sigh) as gorgeous as ever. I am holding on to hope that one day soon she and Dorothy will sail side by side. 

– Tobi 

    
 

Whirlwind Victoria Classic

Over at Dorothy HQ, we are all about classic boats: wooden boats… mainly sailboats, with some love for beautifully designed powerboats too. Appropriately enough, after our adventures at the Classic Boat festival in Victoria, B.C. last weekend, this post is being written aboard a classic boat tucked away in Friday Harbour: the Messenger III, a medical missionary boat built in 1946. It is fantastic.

Just want to interject a hearty Welcome! to all the new friends and Dorothy fans who have joined us since this adventure began. And just in time too, because we have some wonderful images from the festival to share.

It was such a pleasure to meet you, to hear your interest in the Dorothy story, and see you walk away with a smile and occasionally, a t-shirt from our little stand. And a HUGE, big thank you to Harry Martin, Terese Ayre, Laura Simons, Fred Apstein, Misha Warbanski and Arlene Carson who helped man the stand, carry gear/hold the boom/get release forms signed, etc. Thank you so much. We can’t do this without helpers like you!

Before we head to our next adventure at the 2013 Wooden Boat Festival, where Tony Grove (shipwright) and I (Tobi, filmmaker) will be speaking about Dorothy‘s history and present-day restoration, let me introduce two other wonderful people that Dorothy has brought our way: Clay Evans, procurer of fine beverages and artisan cheese Canadian Coast Guard Search and Rescue, author of “Rescue at sea” and all-around stand up guy, and Bill Noon, war correspondent Canadian Coast Guard Commanding Officer, Captain of many ships and in particular, of Messenger III. Together, we make up a merry band that is slowly making its way down to Port Townsend.

Brief recap of the Victoria Classic: lots of filming went from sunrise to sunset, lots of T-shirts were sold (almost $1,000 raised! THANK YOU Pacific Northwest Boaters!) and we captured some great interviews, but time is short so I’ll let the images take it away. Unless otherwise noted, all photos are by Tony Grove. (Check out the ones he took from atop HMCS Oriole’s spreaders!)

Love, Tobi